RPS criticise English prescription charge increase

 

The prescription charges in England will rise to £9.35 from 1st April. The Royal Pharmaceutical Society (RPS) has strongly criticised this move.

 

Commenting on the rise Claire Anderson, Chair of the RPS English Pharmacy Board, said:

 

“Raising prescription charges in England is totally unacceptable. The increase in cost will only add to the highly concerning levels of health inequalities in this country and no-one should be put in a position where they have to go without their medicines because they can’t afford to pay.

 

“By not taking their medicines, people can subsequently become unwell and as a result place more pressure on our health service through hospital admissions. In this current climate, we need to be doing everything we can to ease this pressure and give patients access to their regular medicines without difficulty.

 

“As a member of the Prescription Charges Coalition, we’ll continue to campaign against charges for prescriptions in England, which are free in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. There must be no barrier between a patient and lifesaving medicines.”

 

 

The great patient medication returns debacle

Johnathan Laird Serial Nudger

 

The amount of money drained from the NHS via the oversupply of medication must be staggering and largely unmeasured.

 

I’m talking about the at times mountainous piles of returned medicines that get handed into community pharmacy for disposal.

 

The great patient medication returns debacle.

 

If you’ve ever worked in community pharmacy you’ll know the routine. The bin bags approaching up the middle aisle usually unfortunately from a bereaved close relative. In my experience, these great excesses of prescription drugs handed back to the community pharmacy usually come to light after the passing of a patient. The sadness of the moment is balanced by the mortification of the family members returning said medicines.

 

The empathetic shake of hands happens as you try your best not to raise an eyebrow at the three bin bags of returned medication about to be handed over.

 

Insulin, inhalers and dressings are expensive patients returns but the winner is usually the unused diabetic test strips and lots of them.

 

This problem needs to be tackled. It’s a classic lose-lose situation all around.

 

At the beginning of my career, I really did get irate when this happened. And on occasion, I will admit this probably clouded my mood so that I did not provide the highest level of patient-centred care. These situations would often involve offering condolences which in my more formative years was difficult through a mist of outrage. I’m not really proud of these occasions because family members deserve the care of their community pharmacist at that moment shortly after a bereavement.

 

I’ve often wondered what the public would think if the amount of money that the NHS wastes in this way. What is the average prescription item value these days? Something like £10-£12 per item? I honestly think the general public don’t have any idea about the scale of this problem. Perhaps putting the problem into context might help.

 

And on the flip side the problem really is conveniently difficult to measure because the system assumes that every patient will be adherent to their medication all of the time.

 

Well as pharmacists we know that even the most engaged patients will struggle to achieve 100% adherence.

 

The causes will be multifactorial but no doubt free access to medicines drives a certain amount of volume. Market forces are at play too. There is also the trend towards ‘managed repeat’ services but that’s whole other opinion article altogether. I think any conversation about waste must bring the desire for pharmacy contractors to sign up loyal repeat prescription patients. A patient on a managed repeat prescription service will I’m told generate higher annual dispensing sales compared to those patients not using such a service. I guess it’s easy for me to pontificate given that I don’t currently own a community pharmacy that still depends on prescription volume for profit.

 

One of the reasons I decided to write this article was the link from this topic I made with the charge that was initiated for plastic bags supplied from retailers in recent years.

 

I remember working in a community pharmacy in Scotland when the plastic bag charge was initiated. I found it absolutely hilarious the lengths some folk would go to to avoid the 5p investment in a bag to ensure their walk to the car was comfortable. Instead that first year there was some heroic resistance to splashing out on the bag charge. Things have moved on from then because any form of the plastic bag would surely be frowned upon now due to environmental considerations.

 

Now that’s all very interesting to you I’m sure but the bottom line about the plastic bag charge idea was that it actually worked. The number of bags used by the pharmacy absolutely plummeted. I’m guestimating here but I’d say in the six months after the charge came in the usage of plastic carriers bags in the pharmacy dropped by as much as 80%.

 

The difference before and after implementation of the charge was stark.

 

I think that was probably an example of nudge theory. I highly recommend the book, surprisingly called ‘Nudge’, where these ideas have been articulated.

 

The first chapter of that book involves a little story about a school headmaster. Basically this headmaster was tasked with improving the levels of healthy eating amongst the youngsters at lunchtime. The headmaster was given no extra budget and his brief required student choice to be respected. His solution was to rearrange the cafeteria. He put the fresh fruit, veg and healthy options at the front and the chips, burgers and other less healthy options behind the screen at the far end of the room.

 

Much like in the plastic bag example the plan worked and he began to ‘nudge’ the children towards making healthier options.

 

So what is the ‘nudge’ solution that could be applied to our patient medication return problem?

 

Well unlike our headmaster striving for healthier eating choices we can’t really make it more difficult for patients to access or re-order their medicines in the first place but perhaps we could disincentivise it. At the very least I’d like to support patient education to such an extent that the decision to order is at least considered. There has always been the argument that some kind of charge on prescriptions would be draconian and to be honest I agree.

 

But the lever in the plastic bag success story was a monetary one albeit a very low-level charge. Perhaps the solution could be something simple like making the price of the medicine really clear to our patients or enforcing a nominal 5-10 pence charge per item.

 

I’m not sure what the answer is but what I am fairly sure of is that things can’t get much worse. Wouldn’t it be great if we could stumble upon a low cost ‘nudge’ type solution that tackles this issue once and for all?

 

This amount of waste has to stop so come on clever people answers on a postcard, please.

 

Johnathan Laird is a pharmacist who likes to think he is a serial nudger but probably often doesn’t realise he himself is being nudged.

 

 

 

NHS to take a firmer approach to deter prescription fraud

 

NHS England and NHS Business Services Authority (NHSBSA) are now starting to take a firmer approach to deter fraud.

 

In early 2018, NHSBSA started trialling an approach with people who have received five or more penalty charge notices (PCNs) in a 12-month period but had made no attempt to pay. Selected repeat offenders are now interviewed under caution at a police station and to date, NHSBSA has submitted five cases to the Crown Prosecution Service to consider for criminal proceedings. NHSBSA began a debt collection process for dental cases in January 2019 and is seeking approval for one for prescriptions.

 

NHSBSA is developing a system to reduce the likelihood of fraud or error occurring in the first place by allowing pharmacists and dentists to check peoples’ eligibility for benefit-related exemptions at the time the transaction occurs. A pilot is underway, in four pharmacies, to check health exemptions in real-time, which if successful, could significantly reduce the amount of fraud and error that occurs, and therefore the number of PCNs NHSBSA needs to issue.

 

The NHS estimates that it lost around £212 million in 2017-18 from people incorrectly claiming exemption from prescription and dental charges. However, rules around entitlement are overly complicated leading to genuine mistakes and confusion for many people, according to the National Audit Office.

 

Each year, the NHS dispenses around 1.1 billion prescription items in the community and undertakes around 39 million courses of dental treatment. Around 89% of prescription items dispensed and around 47% of dental treatments are claimed as exempt from charges. NHSBSA administers the distribution of PCNs to those who, either fraudulently or in error, have claimed a free prescription or dental treatment when they were not entitled to do so; or have a valid exemption which cannot be confirmed at the time of checking.

 

Recently, there has been a significant increase in the exemption checks and the total value of PCNs issued. For example, the number of prescription checks has risen from 750,000 in 2014-15 to 24 million by 2018-19. Over the same period, while the number and value of prescription PCNs have risen, the proportion of checks resulting in PCNs has been declining. In 2014-15, one in four checks resulted in a PCN, compared with one in 20 checks by 2018-19. Over this period the value of PCNs issued has risen from £12 million to £126 million per year for prescriptions and from £38 million to £72 million per year for dental treatments.

 

Since 2014, NHSBSA has managed the distribution of 5.6 million PCNs with a total value of £676 million. Of these £133 million (20%) were collected, £297 million (44%) were resolved without a penalty charge being paid, and £246 million (36%) remain outstanding.

 

Since 2014, around 1.7 million PCNs, 30% of those issued, with a value of £188 million, have been issued but subsequently withdrawn because a valid exemption was confirmed to be in place following a challenge. PCNs might also be cancelled where the claimant cannot be identified and located based on the details provided on the prescription or dental form. The penalty charge element of the PCN might also be removed following communication with the individual concerned, although the cost of the prescription or dental treatment will remain payable.

 

NHSBSA spent £11.2 million (31 pence per £1 recovered) in 2017-18 on managing the PCN process. This cost, which includes the cost of the Capita service provided to NHSBSA (Capita manages part of the dental checking service), is covered by the income generated by PCNs, with the surplus paid to NHS England. The NHS Counter Fraud Authority has acknowledged that NHSBSA’s work led to a £49 million reduction in prescription fraud from £217 million in 2012-13 to £168 million in 2016-17.

 

Between September 2014 and March 2019, 114,725 people have received five or more PCNs for prescriptions, indicating a pattern of incorrect claims. However, until recently NHSBSA had taken no action against these people. The NHS Counter Fraud Authority said in 2019 that the focus of NHSBSA’s PCN strategy had been on recovery of losses and charges from penalty notices.

 

NHSBSA accepts that the rules around entitlement, which are set by the Department of Health & Social Care, are complicated and recognises that genuine mistakes and confusion happen.

 

There are a number of factors which may cause mistakes and confusion. These include Universal Credit where claimants are only eligible for exemptions if their monthly earnings are below a specified level; and prescription forms that do not yet include Universal Credit as an option. Confusion can also arise where people need to understand the difference between benefits. For example, a claimant who receives income-based Jobseeker’s Allowance is automatically eligible for free prescriptions and dental treatment, whereas a claimant who receives new-style Jobseeker’s Allowance or contribution-based Jobseeker’s Allowance is not. Furthermore, a person’s eligibility for exemption may vary between prescriptions and dental treatments. Also in some circumstances, such as pregnancy, the person must apply for an exemption certificate to obtain free prescriptions. The length of time that exemptions apply varies according to the circumstances.

 

NHSBSA is unable to identify all vulnerable people in advance of issuing a PCN but will try to limit the impact where such people are later identified. This arrangement relies on the vulnerable person challenging the PCN, and not all vulnerable people may feel able to do so.

 

NHSBSA has only recently undertaken its first national advertising campaign to inform people about PCNs even though it has been significantly increasing its checks since 2014. It also began to develop online support tools to help people determine whether they are eligible for free prescriptions and dental treatment in 2017.

 

Amyas Morse, the head of the NAO, said today:

 

“Free prescriptions and dental treatment are a significant cost to the NHS, so it is reasonable to reclaim funds from people who are not exempt from charges and deter fraud. However, the NHS also needs to have due regard to people who simply fall foul of the confusing eligibility rules.  It is not a good sign that so many penalty charge notices are successfully challenged.

 

Chair of the Royal Pharmaceutical Society in England Sandra Gidley said:

 

“The National Audit Office has highlighted some important issues around prescription charge fines. It is important that we protect every single NHS pound so it can be spent on caring for the public. Pharmacists understand and support this. However, the NAO identifies there’s plenty of room for improvement and the current system is too complicated and bureaucratic. The system needs to be simplified before we start to criminalise those that make a genuine mistake navigating it.

 

“Pharmacists should not be the prescription police – they want to spend their time helping people with their medicines rather than checking their exemption status. It would be much simpler to have free prescriptions for everyone, as is the case in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland because then no-one would have to worry about filling out a form of declaration. They would always have the medicines required, without having to make payment decisions.  It would also enable the investment in issuing and monitoring penalty charge notices to be spent on patient care.

 

“The consequences of the relentless rise in prescription charges are well-known. Surveys* show that 1 in 3 people have not collected their prescription because of the cost. If you can’t afford your medicines, you become iller, which leads to poor health and expensive and unnecessary hospital admissions.

 

“Every day pharmacists are asked by patients who are unable to afford all the items their prescription which ones they could ‘do without’.  Patients shouldn’t have to make choices which involve rationing their medicines. No-one should be faced with a financial barrier to getting the medicines they need.”