Amazon, digital dentistry and how community pharmacies fit

 

We recently had the pleasure of chatting to the founder and owner of Instant Dentist Aalok Shukla. Instant Dentist is an innovative collaborative business that will help community pharmacies extend their digital impact but also deliver much earlier preventative dental care to people as they visit.

 

We came back together to discuss the rapidly changing landscape of community pharmacy in the UK. Instant Dentist is one opportunity that pharmacy owners may wish to avail of but it is the ‘tip of the iceberg’ in terms of possible opportunities.

 

Amazon Pharmacy has started to trade in the USA so the need to evolve is here like never before. We discussed at length how this may impact upon community pharmacy in the UK in future.

 

Hopefully, this chat will give viewers and listeners some ideas on how to get started with incorporating digital activities into your pharmacy business.

 

Aalok commented:

 

“Through easy and affordable access to private dental care, Instant Dentist is the first dental wellness platform that allows you to manage your dental health in a way you’ve never thought was possible. Prevention and diagnosis from an experienced digital dentist is just a click away.”

 

We hope this podcast might give pharmacists across the country inspiration to extend into digital dental services if they have not already done so.

 

 

You can listen and subscribe to our podcasts here.

 

 

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How can community pharmacy add in store digital dental services?

We recently had the pleasure of chatting to the founder and owner of Instant Dentist Aalok Shukla. Instant dentist is an innovative collaborative business that will help community pharmacies extend their digital impact but also deliver much earlier preventative dental care to people as they visit.

 

Aalok commented:

 

“Through easy and affordable access to private dental care, Instant Dentist is the first dental wellness platform that allows you to manage your dental health in a way you’ve never thought was possible. Prevention and diagnosis from an experienced digital dentist is just a click away.”

 

We hope this podcast might give pharmacy owners across the country inspiration to extend into digital dental services if they have not already done so.

 

 

You can listen and subscribe to our podcasts here.

 

 

If you would like to find out more or if you have further questions feel free to fill in the form contact below.

 

We will use your email to put you in touch with the Instant dentist team and delete afterwards. Go to pip.scot to read our privacy policy.

 

If you prefer to never miss an episode you can subscribe on your preferred podcast platform. Just click on the links below to get going.

 

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Why I want to be a pharmacist partner in a GP practice

 

Darshan Negandhi is a Primary Care Network (PCN) clinical pharmacist. Previously he was Director and Superintendent Pharmacist at Lewisham Pharmacy in London.

 

He has recently made the move to work within the PCN and is thoroughly enjoying it. We had a great chat about all things pharmacy. Darshan is very modest but has a fantastic ambition to become a pharmacist partner ina GP practice. With his talent, vision and enthusiasm I fully expect him to achieve this.

 

Thoroughly enjoyed this chat.

 

 

If you prefer to never miss an episode you can subscribe on your preferred podcast platform. Just click on the links below to get going.

 

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What can a hepatitis C eradication service teach us about tackling COVID-19?

 

Dr Andrew Radley is a consultant pharmacist in public health. He works in NHS Tayside and was recently a member of a successful team who managed to eradicate hepatitis C in NHS Tayside.

 

He recently wrote to PIP explaining how 56 community pharmacies helped to eradicate hepatitis C in NHS Tayside.

 

It was a real pleasure to discuss Andrew’s recent activity around hepatitis C and in particular how community pharmacy was central to the success of this project.

 

Our discussion broadened to cover topical issues like the new NHS Pharmacy First service, his views on how important a multidisciplinary team approach is in pharmacy and also his advice to pharmacists who are new to the register.

 

We are unfortunately still in the midst of a global pandemic and I found Andrew’s views on how we can learn from the hepatitis C service as we all work to get to grips with the current situation very interesting. Some fascinating insights here.

 

Andrew is an extremely modest character but I found his work, particularly recently on the hepatitis C front, to be really inspirational. He demonstrates the tangible impact that community pharmacy can have when they are included in a service such as this. He was at pains to make the point that teamwork is key and attributed his personal career success to working effectively as a member of various teams over the years.

 

I highly recommend you have a look at the stories on the hepatitis C service and we have included the original research articles within these stories if you are interested to delve a bit deeper.

 

 

 

 

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Ade Williams on racism in pharmacy

Ade Williams community pharmacist

 

Could you tell me about the first time you experienced racism in your life?

 

The first time I clearly remember unequivocally experienced racism was an incident that happened to my aunty shortly after I arrived in the UK. She worked night shifts and took a bus back home in the morning. I lived with her and would meet her at the last stop for a short walk home together. It was our way of managing our lives. Breaking our ships in the night routine. One day she was not at the stop so I panicked. I was curiously walking around looking for her and could see a commotion. The bus at the next stop further on had passengers waiting to board, but it seemed to have its hazard lights on, a police car also parked alongside.

 

I walked up and could hear my aunty’s voice. What had transpired was that the driver had missed her stop. Quite a prominent one too as it was the local train station.

 

So stopping further along; he offered everybody disembarking an apology for his error. When my aunty was coming off, he, however, turned his face away and kept silent.

 

She asked him:

 

‘’You said sorry to everyone else why are you ignoring me’’.

 

He simply continued ignoring her.

 

Well, she decided to just sit on that bus until he apologised. He panicked and reported into the depot. So out came the police and the station manager. Everybody was polite, but the racial undertones were evident. The issue was they said, we can not make him say sorry as he did for everyone else, but she was also not breaking any law. She had a pass. Of course, the commuters waiting to get on board were also getting agitated. She got down as her intention was never to be a nuisance.

 

How did that feel? 

 

At that time, I was only too aware of the public spectacle. She was a very reserved person, so I was also confused; why she did not just come down and ignore his behaviour?

 

I maybe even thought it did not serve any satisfactory purpose or resolution. She said to me:

 

‘’He treats me like that all the time and today I just wanted him to know it is not right.’’

 

Is racism a problem in pharmacy?

 

I would not say there is a racism problem in pharmacy. I would perhaps say that there is a lack of understanding of the barriers and challenges that some colleagues face because of their race. We are a profession that prides ourselves on our equality of access to our expertise and abhorrence of any sort of prejudice or discrimination.

 

This is what our patients and fellow professionals know and admire about us. It is, therefore, even more, critical that we ensure we actively listen to any voices that have concerns or experiences that do not align with such ideals. Their pain must be our failure. The sense of urgency and also a commitment to addressing such matters is also the only way to assess our genuine commitment to guarding said ideals.

 

Can you give an example(s) of how systemic racism has had an impact on your professional life? 

 

I have been very grateful that I have no instance of systemic racism to share. That said, one of the things that you get taught growing up in a minority community is to stay out of the limelight. Never let others feel threatened by you so you will not be subject to their hostility.

 

A measure for each of us is to think:

 

“Have I not reached out to support, commend, mentor or relate with a/some colleagues as I would otherwise have done because of their race or ethnic background?”

 

It is such an introspective exercise that helps us identify ways we can remain true to our own values. Remember, evidence shows that we all change with time and with age.

 

Another test is to think if I heard an injustice happened to my close friend or colleague, what would my reaction be? Would I be ambivalent or seeking to help bring redress?

 

I am a white pharmacist. Do you think I have advantages over you in our profession? 

 

The first thing is to say you are not the problem. The problem is that if all institutions and organisations must actively seek to foster equity. This will ensure everyone feels valued and supported. We will otherwise end up with people not being given a fair chance to access opportunities or even worse institutions or people feeling very uncomfortable when people who are not their experience of the norm show up to engage or participate constructively.

 

Just imagine if that happens after decades of the said norm prevailing. It can be a challenging experience for all.

 

Does looking at a white person evoke different feelings compared with when you look at a black person?  Do you, or have you ever felt inferior to white members of the pharmacy profession?  How do we fix it? 

 

No. I will have a  laugh, line dance and listen to country music with anyone. Who does not support Man United?

 

Only joking about the Man United bit.

 

You are an indigent person if you make choices on individuals based on how they look, where they are from or how they sound.  It is therefore essential that we are not all made poorer by ensuring we guard our values of equity and diversity and use it to empower those in any way disenfranchised alongside actively supporting those in need of support. We do not have to look too far to find areas to improve: representation, attainment, progression to name a few.

 

What role do white people have in this healing process? What would you like them to understand that they currently don’t? Do you think the #blacklivesmatter is a watershed moment or will the problem remain afterwards? 

 

I think we all have a role to play in any addressing any injustice. Discrimination through racism is not a personal view that I can park aside to perform my professional functions objectively. It is a poison that first damages me and then does the same to every contact you have with others.

 

The #BlackLifeMatters campaign is giving a voice of years of vile individual values tainting institutions and how we all become complacent if we do not actively seek out such evil to nullify it. Even worse if we pretend it does not exist.

 

Always remember one person’s experience of racism and discrimination will become a pain that is shared by many in their close circle initially before diffusing further. When people expect the worst from you, they have an understandably guarded and defensive outlook. That is how the perpetual cycles continue, growing in size and complexity. You won’t be surprised to learn after that after the bus incident with my aunt; I started walking to school instead – 45 minutes each way.  Bought a bike in Uni instead of using the free bus. The dread of public ridicule even now makes me a rational enough person, knowing it is all in my mind act to guard myself. If the bus company had written to apologise to my her who knows if I would think and act differently, we can all speak up and do something to redress a wrong. Silence always feeds complacency.

 

Are there any white leaders in pharmacy that you feel have shown leadership in the battle against structural racism? 

 

I truly believe all of our leaders treasure and embody the values of equality and diversity, but we need to seek out and speedily address the work that needs doing. Some leaders also maybe need to invest time to better understand the problems. To know always preceeds to change. Our Pharmacy House is not standing as tall and untainted as it should be. We must not just seek solace in procedures that protect whistleblowing or in diversity and equality policies. Every good thing happens when people make it a point to champion it. Samantha Quaye is one person always worth speaking to if you are unsure if there is really any work to do or how to.

 

 

 

Jonathan Burton on leading pharmacy out of a crisis

Jonathan Burton MBE community pharmacist independent prescriber and Chair of the Scottish RPS Board

 

Jonathan Burton is Chair of the Royal Pharmaceutical Society Scottish Pharmacy Board and he has been on the frontline in community pharmacy throughout the COVID-19 crisis.

 

We caught up to have a chat about the myriad of unprecedented things that pharmacists and their teams have had to cope with over the last few months. Changes in legislation, delays in registration of pre-registration pharmacists, opportunism from certain organisations and the performance of the RPS during the crisis.

 

 

Below are some of the questions we put to Jonathan. Watch the interview to hear how he responded.

 

Where do we go next in pharmacy?

From a general perspective how do think the government in Scotland has performed in response to the pandemic?

Has the national question in Scotland and the way decisions are taken favoured the profession?

How has the Royal Pharmaceutical Society (RPS) performed during the crisis?

How do you think RPS members feel about the decision to make resources free to the whole profession at the point when the RPS value proposition is arguably most potent?

Have you got any concerns about some of the decisions made by any organisation during the pandemic?

How can RPS support provisionally registered pharmacists?

Do you think there will be increased responsibility on pre-reg tutors during this provisional registration process?

Do you think there is a chance that the issue of vicarious liability could become an issue for pre-reg tutors especially if a provisionally registered student that they are supervising fail the registration exam?

Do you feel that pharmacists have adequate development opportunities over the years and if not why has investment been lacking?

If we encourage remote consultation services like NHS Near Me in community pharmacy why will people need to go to a community pharmacy?

Can you tell us about your early experiences of using NHS Near Me?

Who do you think the next Chief Pharmaceutical Officer of Scotland will be?

 

If you prefer to listen on the go you can subscribe to the PIP podcast.

 

 

If you prefer to never miss an episode you can subscribe on your preferred podcast platform. Just click on the links below to get going.

 

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